[Borsheim Arts]

Borsheim Art Newsletter:

26 June 2003

by Kelly Borsheim copyright 2003

[mermaid]
The Little Mermaid (detail)
bronze sculpture
(shown in clay)
by Kelly Borsheim
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    CONTENTS:
  1. New Work
  2. Calendar
  3. An International Artist!
  4. Music and Sculpture
  5. Teaching Anatomy
  6. Subscription Info.

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New Work

Enhance your spaces with beauty! Two new artworks in clay are headed off to the foundries for bronze casting soon. As usual, the first bronzes in the edition are the best value, with the price going up as the edition becomes less available. Tell me what you think of these new pieces:

THE LITTLE MERMAID:

www.borsheimarts.com/sculpture/2003/mermaid.htm

When I was growing up, my favorite book was a collection of fairy tales by Hans Christian Andersen (1805-75). Fairy tales offer the author a way to teach a lesson to the reader; but in truth, I was charmed by the illustrations and fascinated by the many different ways to interpret the stories. Depending on your mood, you could choose between "Is the glass half full or half empty?" Written in 1836, The Little Mermaid was the tale (pardon the pun) that I identified with the most.

My sculpture The Little Mermaid is inspired by the meeting between our heroine and the Sea Witch. Here is a portion of that passage:

"I know what you want," said the sea witch; "it is very stupid of you, but you shall have your way, and it will bring you to sorrow, my pretty princess. You want to get rid of your fish's tail, and to have two supports instead of it, like human beings on earth, so that the young prince may fall in love with you, and that you may have an immortal soul." And then the witch laughed so loud and disgustingly, that the toad and the snakes fell to the ground, and lay there wriggling about.

"You are but just in time," said the witch; "for after sunrise to-morrow I should not be able to help you till the end of another year. I will prepare a draught for you, with which you must swim to land tomorrow before sunrise, and sit down on the shore and drink it. Your tail will then disappear, and shrink up into what mankind calls legs, and you will feel great pain, as if a sword were passing through you. But all who see you will say that you are the prettiest little human being they ever saw. You will still have the same floating gracefulness of movement, and no dancer will ever tread so lightly; but at every step you take it will feel as if you were treading upon sharp knives, and that the blood must flow. If you will bear all this, I will help you."

"Yes, I will," said the little princess in a trembling voice, as she thought of the prince and the immortal soul.

In payment for such a potion, the Sea Witch demands the lovely voice of the little mermaid and cuts out her tongue. No one said that fairy tales are not gruesome!

Despite this, the story is charming and thought provoking. It is told from the perspective of childlike innocence that is full of the joy and wonder of first experiences. The descriptions are colorful and lively. Reading it is like seeing the world in which we live in a fresh, new way. It is a story of a pure, yet unrequited love, and a search for an immortal soul.

The story has darkness and light and is one of the influences in my observing co-existing opposites. In the end, the little mermaid does not win the soul-sharing love of her prince, but she cannot bear to harm him - even for her own gain. For her unwavering effort and her pure love, she is given a second chance. The story ends on a note of hope, with the message that we can walk the paths of our choosing and obtain our goals with the assistance of those around us. It also contains a subtle warning to all of us that by our actions, we can choose to aid or to harm another.

May The Little Mermaid enchant you with her beauty and inspire you by her good heart and pure determination. To view my interpretation of The Little Mermaid and to find a link to read the entire tale, please visit the following Web page:
www.borsheimarts.com/sculpture/2003/mermaid.htm

One-third down reserves your bronze and you may choose the edition number you prefer, if available.

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TEN:

I have been fascinated lately with doing large sculptures - and with the enlarging process itself. The small bas-relief titled Ten that I completed last fall has been such a popular piece that I thought I would try enlarging it. The large Ten is almost 4 feet tall. It may be viewed online at:
www.borsheimarts.com/sculpture/2003/tenlarge.htm

The introductory price for the large version of Ten is posted online. Again, a deposit of one-third reserves your bronze and you may choose the edition number of your preference. The large Ten is an edition of 12, and # 3 is not available.

I have also had a request to create a large (shield size) version of Chest Piece. That enlargement has now been added to my list of things to do and I will keep you posted on that one as well.

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Calendar

I will again be escaping the Texas heat to go carve marble in Marble, Colorado, in mid- July. If you would enjoy seeing images from my first trip up there, check out:
www.borsheimarts.com/marblem.htm

Thanks to City Art Link, several of my works may be seen at Daya Salon in Austin through July 31st.

In addition, my marine sculpture "Puffer" was recently selected to appear in Rockport, Texas, for a juried sculpture exhibit that runs from July 30th - August 31st. "Puffer" was inspired in part by observing Rugosa Coral and the Canthigaster family of fish, a brightly colored fish that worked well with the raspberry-banded alabaster from Utah from which the sculpture was carved.

The opening reception at the Rockport Center for the Arts is Saturday, August 2, beginning at 5 p.m., so mark your calendars!

Puffer:
www.borsheimarts.com/sculpture/2001/puffer.htm

For more details about the Rockport and my fall shows, visit my exhibits page online at:
www.borsheimarts.com/exhibits.htm

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An International Artist!

Speaking of the joy of first experiences, I am so excited to be able to share with you news of my first sale outside of the United States! A collector in the United Kingdom bought a Borsheim bronze sculpture. Since it is a future gift for his dear one, I don't want to ruin any surprises with more details.

Also, I was invited to exhibit in Italy by the curator of Museo Gilardi in Lucca, Italy. So if you would like to see some of my artworks in person while you are in Europe, please contact:

Cristiano Merra, Museo Gilardi
Via Cugnia 1275, 55046 Querceta
Forte dei Marmi, Lucca
ITALY
Tel./Fax (+011) 39.0584.752805

For other locations my work may be seen, please visit:
www.borsheimarts.com/galleries.htm

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Music and Sculpture:

More and more I feel myself maturing as an artist. Each new artwork I create teaches me something. Sometimes I learn about the material, such as a new (to me) marble's personality; sometimes I learn a new use for a tool. Increasingly I find that the execution of one idea leads to several others.

As a visual artist, my job is to communicate in a language other than the spoken or written word. I am constantly thinking about how light striking a form or texture creates a certain emotional response in the viewer or how a particular shape carries meaning for us. Subject matter is simply an instrument with which to express ideas to you.

For several months now, I have been slowly returning to my musical background. Music is universal and moves us in so many different ways. In school I was always fascinated with music theory (and the mathematics of it). I wonder now if I could employ some of the techniques used by composers to touch my audience as deeply as their music touches theirs. This is not a new concept, but one I hope to start incorporating into my work on a conscience level.

For instance, how does one visually communicate the audio experiences of pianissimo (soft/quiet) and fortissimo (very loud)? What about the gradual building of anticipation and excitement that happens with a certain progression of notes? Can the musical effect of syncopation (stressing the "weak" beat of a musical measure) be duplicated in a way that can be read by our fingers and our eyes? And what about the feelings evoked by a change in tempo or the comfort in familiarity of a recurring melodic phrase?

How can I visually portray the deep round sound of a timpani drum and share the experience of the emotion I feel as it fades away like a lingering memory? Could I create in sculpture the feelings of peacefulness that a lullaby elicits? How about the way Brazilian music makes my hips move without my even realizing it? Or how an unexpected instrumental phrase makes me laugh out loud?

And lately, I have been carrying around in my head the high clear, soaring voice of Klaus Meine of the Scorpions as he sings the rock ballad "Still Loving You". When I hear certain passages, I can almost see an arcing bridge from someplace familiar to somewhere not yet explored.

As with reading a book and listening to a piece of music, it takes time to appreciate a work of fine art. You do not "get it" all at once. It draws you in and unfolds its beauty over a period of time. And hopefully, with each repeated encounter with the piece, you will notice something new or experience again a sense of awe.

And that is my challenge . . .

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Teaching Anatomy:

I have taken the summer off to physically try to catch up with what is going on in my head, but I will be teaching again in September. For 6 hours each Saturday that month, I will teach a human anatomy class at the Austin Sculpture Center. For details and a supply list, please visit:
www.borsheimarts.com/class.htm

*****

In closing, I wish you a joyous summer (or winter depending on your location). Feel free to contact me if you would like to add a work of art to your surroundings. And thank you so much for your interest!

With kindest regards,
Kelly Borsheim
26 June 2003

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