[Borsheim Arts]

Borsheim Art Newsletter:

22 April 2004

by Kelly Borsheim copyright 2004

[Icarus]

The Triumph of Icarus (detail)
60 x 30" painting
by Kelly Borsheim

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    CONTENTS:
  1. The Triumph of Icarus
  2. Sculptors' Dominion
  3. Michelangelo or Bust!
  4. Sculpture in the South
  5. Subscription Info.

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Dear Reader,

The first time I heard about the Greek legend of Icarus, I felt lectured: Do not try to get to heaven (or disobey your parent?) or you will fail and die. As the story goes, Daedalus and his young son Icarus were imprisoned by King Minos in a tower on the island of Crete, guarded heavily by surrounding sea vessels. The inventor Daedalus devised an escape by air by creating wings made from feathers and wax, but warned his son not to fly too high or the wax would melt, nor too low or the moisture from the sea would dampen and clog the wings. But up in the air, filled with the thrill of flying, Icarus forgot his father's warnings and soared closer to the sun. His wings melted and he plunged to his death in the sea below.

But what really was his crime that was worthy of such consequences? You cannot say it was too much ego or pride, for it was his clever father Daedalus, not Icarus, who came up with the idea and fashioned the wings made from the available materials.

Best I can tell, Icarus was guilty of forgetting the seriousness of his situation and living in the moment, of pursuing joy and exaltation. Youthful folly, if you will. Almost all of the art I have ever seen created about Icarus, who ironically became more famous than his inventor father, portrays the boy's fall from the skies. (Isn't it odd that Daedalus would attempt to escape during the heat of the day? But then, we would have no story . . . ) Wildly ineffective wings are often depicted in a near-vertical position above Icarus's body to portray his rapid descent into the ocean, to his impending death.

But I was always intrigued by that transitory interval, no matter how brief, in which Icarus was one with his environment. That quiet moment that he had to himself to realize, "Wow, I am really here. And it is amazing." It is our fascination with the unknown and the un-experienced that causes us to take great risks. And that is part of why Icarus has remained immortal to us.

So now you know most of my thoughts while creating one of my newest paintings, The Triumph of Icarus. If you would like to get a better idea of what it looks like, please click here.

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Sculptors' Dominion Invitational 2004:

The Sculptors' Dominion exhibit in San Antonio featuring large or garden-sized sculptures celebrates its opening weekend this Saturday and Sunday. I have 4 works on display around the 7-acre property that features sculpture of various media in a landscaped setting - no booths or "store-like" appearance. The exhibit is open on weekends through May 31.

I will be attending the show this Saturday, April 24th, for both the daytime hours (10 a.m. to 3 p.m., $10 admission fee) and the evening patron party (7-10 p.m., $25 admission). For more information about the exhibit, please visit:
borsheimarts.com/exhibits.htm

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Michelangelo or Bust!

Besides The Triumph of Icarus, I have been creating many new paintings and sculptures to show you. One of my collectors and dear friend Terry Wilemon and her husband Jay are hosting an Open House for me in their home in Lakeway (west of Austin). You are invited to this event (and if you are on my print mailing list and live in Texas, you will receive an invitation through the mail soon). I hope you will help me spread the word and invite your friends. I cannot wait to show you what I have been working on!

The Open House is titled Michelangelo or Bust! (to help me get to study in Italy this summer) and is being held on Thursday, May 6, from 4 p.m. to 9 p.m. For details (including a map with directions), please visit:
borsheimarts.com/michelangelo.htm

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Sculpture in the South:

And finally, my last exhibit before I head off to Italy for 6 weeks is in Summerville, South Carolina on May 15 and 16. I would love to see you at the Sculpture in the South exhibit - it is a really lovely area. For details, check out:
borsheimarts.com/exhibits.htm

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Thank you so much for sharing this journey with me. I do not know if I will have time to write again before my Italy trip, but rest assured that I will be back in contact in late July or early August and will have lots of images to share with you. I have been practicing hiking with my backpack loaded with rocks to get me in shape for this trip. I have also built a small paintbox (it weighs less than 3 pounds!), so between studying Michelangelo's works (and all the other artists in Italy) in person, I doubt I will be at a loss for things to do. So, ciao!

*****

If you enjoy Borsheim Art News, please forward it to friends and colleagues. It comes to you about 6 times a year from Cedar Creek, Texas-based artist Kelly Borsheim, sculptor and painter of marine life and the art of the human form.

Thank you for reading,
Kelly Borsheim
22 April 2004


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