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[Borsheim Arts Studio]

Borsheim Art Newsletter:

18 November 2004

by Kelly Borsheim copyright 2004

Patinas For Silicon Bronze
Patinas For Silicon Bronze

by Patrick V. Kipper
Note: Many patineurs consider this the "Bible" of the chemical art form of patination.

    CONTENTS:
  1. New Galleries
  2. Bronze Patina - what is that all about?
  3. Tips on Art
  4. New Sculpture Works
  5. A Tribute to Bronze Foundry Workers
  6. Subscription Info.

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Dear Reader,

I hope this letter finds you well.

After all this rain we have been having (at least in Texas), are you looking to get out for a bit this weekend? Why not check out the Texas Hill Country Art & Wine Trail? Fifteen art and/or winery businesses are rolling out the red carpet again for this semi-annual event. You can even see some of my sculptures at the participating:
The Gallery At Spicewood
9410 Hwy 71, Spicewood, Texas 78669
Tel. (830) 798-2020

The owners Joe & Sherry Verdoorn would love to see you - they are even offering refreshments during this weekend's events. They will be open both Saturday and Sunday from noon to 5:30 p.m. along with a select group of galleries and wineries. In addition, trail maps are available at each participating location.

And in case you find yourself out on the road between Austin and Houston, please stop by and say hello to my newest gallery friends, Lana Thompson & Joe Mole. They own the charming Thompson * Mole Gallery in LaGrange at 457 East Colorado Street (1 block north of HEB Grocery on Business 71); Call them at: Tel. (979) 968-3094

For other locations you may view my work, please visit:
www.borsheimarts.com/galleries.htm

and do not forget, if you would like to see my work in your neighborhood, please visit your local gallery and ask for my work by name! You just never know what could happen.

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Bronze Patina

One thing that I share with many of my art collectors is a love of process. It is difficult to surround yourself with art without getting intrigued by how it is made. Because I have had several collectors ask me such interesting questions about the beautiful patinas I have been adding in my latest works, I thought I should do a wee bit more writing to explain. If you, too, are curious about the process of coloring metal, please read my newest Web page in the "PROCESS" section of my site:
www.borsheimarts.com/patina.htm

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Tips on Art

Tips on Art is an arts organization whose motto is "We are better together." In this spirit, Tips has created Learning Library Segments on their Web site. They want to inspire our next generation of artists by sharing conversations they have with career artists. In July, the Tips on Art founder Donna Wetegrove and art enthusiast Jenny Turney came out to my studio to interview me for one of these segments. Perhaps you would enjoy sharing this interview with some young art enthusiast you want to encourage:
www.tipsonart.org/programs/kelly_borsheim.php

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New Sculpture Works

  1. Art therapy often seems to lift my spirits and suggest solutions. The following sculpture helped to cure what once ailed me. Perhaps this stone carving titled "Get Out" will bring a smile to your lips as well.
    www.borsheimarts.com/sculpture/2004/getout.htm
  2. What started out in the mountains near the Yule Marble quarry in Colorado was finally finished up in my home studio in Texas.
    www.borsheimarts.com/sculpture/2004/torsomarble.htm
  3. Besides taking my dream trip, one of the perks of going to Italy for the summer is that I was able to promise myself to return home and finish up several artworks that began years ago. "Torso 8" started out as a mathematical shape in the stone and ended up as a female torso with a subtle hint of the male energy on the opposite side. This sculpture is in a very lovely crème-colored Utah alabaster.
    www.borsheimarts.com/sculpture/2004/torso8.htm

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A Tribute to Bronze Foundry Workers

The more I try to get accomplished, the more I realize just how many skilled people it takes to create sculpture, especially a bronze work. I have experience doing each stage of the lost wax casting process: creating an original, making a 2-part mold, pouring hollow wax duplicate sculptures, spruing and venting, remolding, pouring the molten bronze, chasing the metal and then adding a patina. But I also believe that each of us has a special set of skills and, in the spirit of Thanksgiving, I would like to take the time to acknowledge those who help me create my bronze works.

Foundry workers are the behind-the-scene gems. While some specialize in certain areas of the process, others do it all. Without their expert help, I would spend too much of my time in the casting arena and not in the creating. They are gracious in that they not only allow me to proof each step of the process once they feel their work is done, but they often give me tips and a better understanding of their individual techniques, thus building a stronger working relationship and creating the most accurate castings.

In addition, as I start to bid on larger projects, foundry owners are quick to help me learn the ropes and speak intelligently on aspects of a job that I might not have considered. Because of their vast experience and counsel, I am able to make accurate deadline promises and deliver art on time. They truly are interested in helping me succeed and it is uplifting to be around them.

So please allow me to thank the following the extra special foundeurs in my life: John and Kay Kasson (happy anniversary this month, you two!), their son Joe Kasson; Jim Thomas; Dan, Marti, and Doug Pogue; and Mark Palmerton.

I would also like to acknowledge the many contributions of my smarter half, John Borsheim. A mechanical engineer is a wonderful partner for a sculptor. His thoroughness gives him the "dubious honor" of being my mold-maker, patineur, often base maker, and sculpture installation guy. I love his attention to detail. I appreciate his knowledge of how to move heavy objects and stones using brain, not so much brawn! And I have learned a lot about tools and structural support from him.

In closing, I wish you all a happy Thanksgiving and upcoming holiday season. Please let me know how I can make your holidays brighter.

Thank you for reading,
Kelly Borsheim
18 November 2004


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